Monday, December 7, 2009

AS SEEN ON TV: DOROTHY DANDRIDGE

DOROTHY DANDRIDGE

AS SEEN IN:
"Introducing Dorothy Dandridge"

AS PLAYED BY:
Halle Barry

Dorothy Jean Dandridge (November 9, 1922 – September 8, 1965) was an American actress and popular singer. Dandridge was the first African American to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress.

All of her early parts were stereotypical African-American roles, but her singing ability and presence brought her popularity in nightclubs around the country.

In 1954, director and writer Otto Preminger cast Dandridge, along with Harry Belafonte, Pearl Bailey, Brock Peters, Diahann Carroll, Madame Sul-Te-Wan (uncredited), and Joe Adams in his production of "Carmen Jones". Dandridge's singing voice was dubbed by Marilyn Horne.
"Carmen Jones" grossed $60,000 during the first week and $47,000 in the second upon release in 1955. The film received favorable reviews, and Dandridge was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress, becoming only the third African American to receive a nomination in any Academy Award category (after Hattie McDaniel and Ethel Waters). Grace Kelly won for her performance in "The Country Girl".

On September 8, 1965, Dandridge spoke by telephone with friend Gerry Branton. Dandridge was scheduled to fly to New York the next day to prepare for her nightclub engagement at Basin Street East. Several hours after her conversation with Branton ended, Dandridge was found dead by her manager, Earl Mills. Two months later a Los Angeles pathology institute determined the cause to be an accidental overdose of Imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant. She was 42 years old.
(edited from Wikipedia)
BCnU